Q. Wilson Hodges Photograph Collection

Title

Q. Wilson Hodges Photograph Collection

Subject

Public buildings - Virginia - Williamsburg - 1900-1910
Historic buildings - Virginia - Williamsburg - 1900-1910
Williamsburg (Va.) - Photographs

Williamsburg (Va.) - Buildings, structures, etc.

Description

Nineteen albumen photographs and one silver gelatin photograph mounted on board of historic structures in Williamsburg, Yorktown, and Jamestown, Virginia, either taken by or collected by Q. Wilson Hodges while a student at the College of William and Mary.

Among the photos documenting historic structures in Williamsburg are the Powder Magazine, the George Wythe House, Bruton Parish Church, the Wren Building, the Brafferton Building, and the President’s House. A view looking west down Duke of Gloucester Street from the Capitol site shows the exposed foundations of the structure as excavated by the Association for the Preservation of Virginia Antiquities (APVA) after their acquisition of the property in 1897. The monument erected in 1904 to commemorate members of the House of Burgesses who formed associations against the importation of British goods is visible at the center of the photo.

Another intriguing photograph captures the crenellated brick building next to the Thomas Everard House that served as a law office. It was torn down in the early 1950s when restoration work progressed to the Everard property. Located on the north side of the Everard House on Palace Green, the small outbuilding resembling a castle became a distinctive landmark when Misses Estelle and Cora Smith opened the house to boarders in the early twentieth century. The collection also includes images of the ruins of the church tower and Ambler House on Jamestown Island and Grace Episcopal Church and the Moore House in Yorktown.


Invented by French photographer Louis Desire Blanquart Evrard in 1850, the albumen print became a dominant photographic process between 1855-1895. A wet-plate process, it involved sensitizing salted paper in a silver nitrate bath, drying it, and then placing the paper in a frame that could then be put in contact with a glass-collodian negative. When exposed to daylight, the photographic image would begin to appear on the paper. An egg white binder aided in distributing the light sensitive particles in a smooth manner across the paper. This binder is what helps give albumen prints a glossy surface and their trademark yellow or reddish brown cast.

Creator

Hodges, Q. Wilson

Date

1904-1906

Collection Items

Hodges-020 w.jpg

Hodges, Q. Wilson Circa 1904
Hodges-016w.jpg

Hodges, Q. Wilson Circa 1904
Hodges-015 w.jpg

Hodges, Q. Wilson Circa 1904
Hodges-014 w.jpg

Hodges, Q. Wilson Circa 1904
Hodges-013 w.jpg

Hodges, Q. Wilson Circa 1904
Hodges-012 w.jpg

Hodges, Q. Wilson Circa 1904
Hodges-011 w.jpg

Hodges, Q. Wilson Circa 1904
Hodges-010 w.jpg

Hodges, Q. Wilson Circa 1904
Hodges-009 w.jpg

Hodges, Q. Wilson Circa 1904
Hodges-008 w.jpg

Hodges, Q. Wilson Circa 1904
Hodges-007 w.jpg

Hodges, Q. Wilson Circa 1904
Hodges-006 w.jpg

Hodges, Q. Wilson Circa 1904
Hodges-005 w.jpg

Hodges, Q. Wilson Circa 1904
Hodges-004 w.jpg

Hodges, Q. Wilson Circa 1904
Hodges-003 w.jpg

Hodges, Q. Wilson Circa 1904
Hodges 002 w.jpg

Hodges, Q. Wilson Circa 1904
Hodges 001 w.jpg

Hodges, Q. Wilson Circa 1905
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